Volunteering: Spread the Love

 In Blog Categories, Your Community

Research indicates that volunteers who devote a “considerable” amount of time to volunteer activities (about 100 hours per year) are most likely to exhibit positive health outcomes. Volunteering is good for you!

Wilma Jenkins has always known that she wanted to be a teacher. Even after turning 80 years old, she is doing what she loves: education. Ms. Jenkins works with the Atlanta Regional Commission through a program called RSVP (the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program).  She goes into the community to give free presentations on healthy living to peers in senior centers, libraries, senior housing facilities, and other groups.

“One of the ways to be active is to volunteer,” she advises in this video. “Go out there in your community and do something for somebody else. When you give, you get. It comes back to you double.”

One of RSVP’s most popular presentations is called “Healthy Sexuality as We Age”. You can request an engaging RSVP speaker for your group for free, or learn more about volunteering with the RSVP program below!

What is RSVP?

RSVP is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service and one of the largest volunteer networks of adults age 55+ in the United States. In the Atlanta region, RSVP is sponsored by the Atlanta Regional Commission. RSVP volunteers provide peer to peer education through free educational presentations, community events, and counseling all geared to help older adults remain healthy, active, and independent.

What do Volunteers Do?

RSVP volunteers are out in the community sharing information on various important health and wellness topics like Medication Management, Disaster Preparedness, Diabetes, and Healthy Sexuality, and linking individuals to programs and services just to name a few of our activities. They go to senior centers, faith-based organizations, and other community locations sharing this information to groups of all sizes.

Who Can Volunteer?

To be a volunteer you must be 55 years or older. Our volunteers represent all walks of life – retired doctors, military, accountants, teachers, and homemakers– and they bring the varied experiences gained through their lifetimes which contributes to the richness of the program. They have amazing talents and are called to give back at this time in their lives. You don’t have to be an expert to be an RSVP volunteer. We provide the training you need to feel comfortable sharing with your peers. All you need is a willingness to learn and a passion to help others.

Why Volunteer?

Volunteering can be a fulfilling next chapter after retirement. It’s also a great way to stay healthy and active. Research indicates that volunteers who devote a “considerable” amount of time to volunteer activities (about 100 hours per year) are most likely to exhibit positive health outcomes. Volunteering is good for you!  In additional to delaying age-related physical health problems and improving mental and emotional health, RSVP has other benefits:

  • Opportunity to meet new people
  • Remain an active and vital part of the community
  • Learn and develop new skills – can be used for employment or self-satisfaction
  • Share your knowledge, wisdom, and experience with others
  • Participate in training and professional development opportunities

 

Check out empowerline to find volunteer opportunities, or call us (404)463-3333.

Showing 2 comments
  • valorie roberts
    Reply

    I would like to serve the community. Im a retired teacher. I volunteer at my church with the Outreach Ministry and also at The Fernbank Museum. How can I help? Thank you.

    • Katie Perumbeti
      Katie Perumbeti
      Reply

      We’re glad you’re interested in volunteering! Please fill out the form located at https://www.empowerline.org/volunteer/ and one of our volunteer coordinators will be in touch with you.

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